ONE CUP ONE SIP ONE CHANGE

HOW YOU DO ANYTHING IS HOW YOU DO EVERYTHING

You may have heard that phrase, attributed to many, often said in yoga classes and diametrically, personal coaching sessions…but, there is a certain resonance to it, if you think about it.    

Once we are of an age to make mindful decisions, our choices are defined by our character.  

How about those non-public, unseen choices we make a million times a day.  Do you zone out when your friend/colleague is sharing her pain relating to her husband/son/mother/daughter,  or her own.  Are you glancing at your watch when someone is sharing their new, exciting (to them) news?  

By now, you’ve heard the term Fair Trade.  Your  fair trade certified purchases affirm that it matters to you that the people who produce the commodities you purchase, receive a fair compensation for their labor.  When they receive a fair  wage, their children can go to school and break the cycle of poverty that envelopes their community.

HOW YOU DO ANYTHING IS HOW YOU DO EVERYTHING.  

Buying fair trade coffee, chocolate and other products affirms that you are who you are claiming to be.  

BUY FAIR TRADE – IT JUST TASTES BETTER!

UNcoolbeans.com

UNcoolbeans.wordpress.com

Advertisements

THINK BEFORE YOU DRINK

You love coffee.   I mean, Really, Really love coffee! ♥ ♥  ♥ Sometimes at night, right before you go to bed, for a millisecond, you think,   “Oh wow, I can’t wait ‘til morning when I’ll smell the coffee brewing, and then….pour a cup, and then …that rapid whiff of the aroma of the coffee as it makes its way from the mug, to the brim of the mug, to your mouth, where, ta da! the aroma and the taste mingle and mmmmm,  life is good, or least, it has  Potential.   Cool.

And,  it gets better.  Unlike some moments, where the first moment can never be better, never be duplicated, where the first time is always that distant memory of, well, the first time, with coffee, the second sip, uh huh, is somehow better.  The taste and the aroma blend with the first, almost imperceptible, little sensory excitement as the caffeine starts to do its thing where delicious meets energy and voila – life is great!  Very cool.

Join the club.  You and millions of others, globally, have helped make coffee the second most popular non-alcoholic drink, after tea, ever!

Fantastic!  You love coffee.  Coffee is delicious, aromatic, stimulating, cheap, and legal.

OK, a slight digression.  On your way to work, you indulge in another cup and what if,  just what if,  the barista, the 7-Eleven clerk, the Denny’s cashier, the McDonalds’s nameless face at the drive-through, just handed a cup of coffee that was made through  the  use of forced, child labor.

http://ihscslnews.org/view_article.php?id=178

Seriously, what if the beans from that from that cup originated from a field where little kids are forced to work there, 12- 14 hours a day.

If you KNEW that, would you still buy that cup of coffee?

Awareness is freedom.

Think before you drink.

Uncoolbeans

*What I am for is justice for everyone, just like it says in the Constitution. 
Richard Pryor

     Fair trade products are now readily available and often not more expensive than the mass marketer retailers where product origins can be traced to human trafficking, child labor and sweat shops.  Coffee, chocolate and sugar are a few that are on every grocery and big box store shelves.  Look for the Fair Trade Certification label.  

     I envision a future where disbelief that slavery still exists is replaced with shock that products grown, made, and manufactured with the blood and sweat of slave and child labor were available and purchased in the 21st century.

     Fair trade – it just tastes better.

UNCOOLBEANS.COM

RAISING AWARENESS ONE SIP AT A TIME

THINK BEFORE YOU DRINK

View original post

HERSHEYS BUYS TIME WHILE WASTING CHILDREN

“The Harkin-Engel Protocol,[A] sometimes referred to as the Cocoa Protocol, is an international agreement aimed at ending the worst forms of child labor (according to the International Labor Organization‘sConvention 182) and forced labor (according to ILO Convention 29) in the production of cocoa, the main ingredient in chocolate. The protocol was negotiated by Senator Tom Harkin and Representative Eliot Engel in response to a documentary and multiple articles in 2000 and 2001 reporting widespread child slavery and child trafficking in the production of cocoa. The protocol was signed in September 2001. Joint Statements in 2001, 2005 and 2008 and a Joint Declaration in 2010 extended the commitment to address the problem. As of 2012, it is unclear if the protocol reduced child labor in the production of cocoa, though the cocoa industry claims five of the six articles have been addressed and the final one is being actively pursued.”  Wikipedia

“Fair trade” campaigns have led to agreements by chocolate makers to help clean up the cocoa supply chain, but activists and researchers say little has changed in the decade since the U.S. Congress passed the Harkin-Engel Protocol to introduce a “no child slavery” label for chocolate marketed in the United States.”

“But all the protocol requirements were not met by the deadline.[17] The cocoa industry failed to create and implement an industry-wide certification standard to indicate that cocoa had not been produced with the worst forms of child labor.[17] The chocolate companies, who had $13 million in US sales in 2001, were criticized for executing the protocol at the smallest cost,[11] remaining mostly hands-off in the process without changing the process,[23] and maintaining a business model dependent on child labor.[23] More importantly, they did not alter the price of chocolate to enable the cocoa producers to end the practice of slavery.[11][23] One of the major obstacles to executing the protocol was the Ivorian Civil War.[11][24] Along with diamonds and timber, cocoa was a conflict resource that made money for the militants.[24] 

…”After the deadline passed, the International Labor Rights Fund filed a lawsuit in 2005 under the Alien Tort Claims Act against NestleCargill and Archer Daniels Midland on behalf of three Malian children. The suit alleged the children were trafficked to Côte d’Ivoire, forced into slavery, and experienced frequent beatings on a cocoa plantation.[29][30] In September 2010, the US District Court for the Central District of California determined corporations cannot be held liable for violations of international law and dismissed the suit. The case was appealed to the US Court of Appeals.[31][32]

…”In 2012, Miki Mistrati, creator of the award-winning documentary, The Dark Side of Chocolate, claimed the protocol is just “a document and politics” because there has been no progress. He thinks that the same issues will be present in five years and that changes will not come through the protocol, but instead from consumers who demand change.[44] 

 

Image

 

Fact:  Hersheys states in will align itself with fair labor standards by 2020.

Fact:  You don’t have to be a bean counter to  see that at least eight years will pass before Hersheys retools and commits.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/04/hersheys-certified-cocoa-2020_n_1938741.html

 

TAKE A STAND -SLAVE FREE CANDY FOR HALLOWEEN

Child slavery and chocolate: All too easy to find

In “Chocolate’s Child Slaves,” CNN’s David McKenzie travels into the heart of the Ivory Coast to investigate children working in the cocoa fields. (More information and air times on CNN International.)

By David McKenzie and Brent Swails, CNN

Daloa, Ivory Coast (CNN) – Chocolate’s billion-dollar industry starts with workers like Abdul. He squats with a gang of a dozen harvesters on an Ivory Coast farm.

Abdul holds the yellow cocoa pod lengthwise and gives it two quick cracks, snapping it open to reveal milky white cocoa beans. He dumps the beans on a growing pile.

Abdul is 10 years old, a three-year veteran of the job.

He has never tasted chocolate.

During the course of an investigation for CNN’s Freedom Project initiative – an investigation that went deep into the cocoa fields of Ivory Coast – a team of CNN journalists found that child labor, trafficking and slavery are rife in an industry that produces some of the world’s best-known brands.

It was not supposed to be this way.

http://thecnnfreedomproject.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/19/child-slavery-and-chocolate-all-too-easy-to-find/

FUN SIZE??? -YOUR CANDY BAR WAS MADE BY CHILD SLAVES

FUN SIZE?  

HersheyKissescry_small

(Updated September 30, 2015)

A new class action lawsuit was filed Monday against Hershey, Mars and Nestle alleging the companies are guilty of false advertising for failing to disclose the use of child slavery thereby deceiving consumers into unwittingly supporting the child slave trade.

A  documentary (Slavery, A Global Investigation) released in 2000, quotes one of the child slaves:

“Asked what he’d say to the billions who eat chocolate worldwide (most of the boys have never tried it), one boy replies: “They enjoy something I suffered to make; I worked hard for them but saw no benefit. They are eating my flesh.”

The boys’ stories are sickeningly graphic. Before beatings, the boys say they were stripped naked and tied up. They were then pummeled with a variety of weapons, from fists and feet to belts and whips.

THIS HALLOWEEN DON’T LET YOUR KIDS ACCEPT CANDY MADE BY CHILD SLAVES

SPEAK WITH YOUR DOLLARS AND DON’T BUY CANDY FROM COMPANIES THAT FAIL TO ADHERE TO INTERNATIONAL LAW AND THAT STILL USE CHILD SLAVERY IN THEIR CANDY SUCH AS HERSHEY’S, NESTLE, MARS, WHOPPERS, REESES, KIT-KAT’S AND ANY COMPANY WITHOUT THE  FAIR TRADE LABEL

Cocoa’s first consumers are chocolate companies, which could clean up the industry by refusing to buy beans produced by children.

The International Labor Rights Forum (ILRF) has a scorecard to assess the progress companies are making in their alleged efforts to stop exploiting child labor. It shows that if chocolate-makers had the same motivation to make chocolate as they are in fighting child slavery, the industry would have crumbled long ago.

Although the battle began in 2001, Hershey “continues to drag its feet in dealing with child and trafficked labor in its supply chain,” reports ILRF. “Like Mars and Nestle, Hershey has not effectively produced transparency or accountability…”

Nestle has been a main target of reformers because “unlike other chocolate manufacturers Nestle directly sources cocoa from West Africa and has direct control over its supply chain…” says ILRF.

http://www.viewzone.com/chocolarte.html

Update

September 30, 2015.

Lawsuit: Your Candy Bar Was Made By Child Slaves

A lawsuit filed Monday alleges that some of the world’s largest chocolate makers are knowingly using child labor in Africa.
The Milton Hershey School in Pennsylvania is one of the wealthiest education centers in the world. Founded in 1909 as an orphanage for “male Caucasian” boys, it was awarded 30 percent of the company’s future earnings by Milton S. Hershey upon his death. Thanks to the success of Kit-Kats, Reese’s, and Whoppers, the school is worth a staggering $7.8 billion.

Now home to more than 2,000 students, it owns a controlling interest in the $22.3 billion Hershey company—a chocolate maker with roots in child protection and education that, in the worst form of irony, allegedly relies on cocoa harvested by child laborers in West Africa.

It is this irony that serves as the motivation behind a class action lawsuit filed Monday against Hershey and two of its competitors, Mars and Nestle. The complaints, filed by three California residents, allege that the companies are guilty of false advertising for failing to disclose the use of child slavery on their packaging. Without it, the plaintiffs claim, the companies are deceiving consumers into “unwittingly” supporting the child slave labor trade.

“America’s largest and most profitable food conglomerates should not tolerate child labor, much less child slave labor, anywhere in their supply chains,” the complaint reads. “These companies should not turn a blind eye to known human rights abuses… especially when the companies consistently and affirmatively represent that they act in a socially and ethically responsible manner.”

The class action suits seek both monetary damages for California residents who have purchased the chocolate and revised packaging that denotes child slaves were used. It’s a new approach to an old problem; the chocolate industry’s deep, dark, not-so-secret scandal. It’s been 15 years since the first allegations of child slavery in the chocolate industry caused national outrage. Will this be the final straw?

West Africa is home to two-thirds of the world’s cacao beans (cocoa), the main ingredient in chocolate—a product that’s fueled a $90 billion industry.

The first group to question the financial strategies behind the industry’s wealth was a British organization called True Vision Entertainment. In a shocking 2000 documentary titled Slavery: A Global Investigation, the group reported on the chocolate industry’s alleged connection to cocoa harvested by child slaves. The award-winning film opens on stick-thin adolescent boys in the Ivory Coast slinging hundred-pound bags of cocoa pods on their backs, followed by an interview in which the boys express their confusion over not being paid.

Later the filmmakers meet with 19 children who were said to have just been freed from slavery by the Ivorian authorities. Their guardian describes how they worked from dawn until dusk each day, only to be locked in a shed at night where they were given a tin cup in which to urinate. During the first six months (the “breaking-in period”), they say, they were routinely beaten. “The beatings were a part of my life,” says Aly Diabata, one of the former child laborers. “I had seen others who tried to escape. When they tried, they were severely beaten.”

The boys’ stories are sickeningly graphic. Before beatings, the boys say they were stripped naked and tied up. They were then pummeled with a variety of weapons, from fists and feet to belts and whips. In the film, some of the boys get up and imitate the beatings. Others stand to reveal hundreds of scars lining their backs and torsos—some still bloody and scabbed. They get quiet when the filmmakers ask whether any are beaten today and say some are simply “taken away.”

Asked what he’d say to the billions who eat chocolate worldwide (most of the boys have never tried it), one boy replies: “They enjoy something I suffered to make; I worked hard for them but saw no benefit. They are eating my flesh.” Toward the end of the segment, the filmmakers meet with one of the “slave masters,” who admits he purchased the young boys and that some of his men routinely beat them. His reasoning: He is paid a low price for the cocoa and thus needs to harvest as much of it as he possibly can.

The release of the film in late 2000 sparked national outrage. No one seemed more shocked than the chocolate companies themselves. In June 2001, Hershey senior vice president Robert M. Reese told Philadelphia Inquirer reporter Bob Hernandez that “no one, repeat, no one, had ever heard of this.” After internal investigations, several companies, including Hershey, expressed concern over the conditions of laborers in West Africa.

The news made its way to Congress, where U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel quickly drafted legislation asking the Federal Drug Administration to introduce “slave free” labeling. After gaining approval in the House of Representatives, the bill moved to a vote in the Senate, where it had the support needed to win passage. But just before the legislation made it to a vote, the chocolate industry stepped in with a promise it has yet to keep: to self-regulate and eradicate the practice by 2005.

The Engel-Harkin Protocol (or Cocoa Protocol), as the agreement was called, was signed in September 2001.

Eight companies—including Nestle, Mars, and Hershey—were signatories of the massive accord, pledging $2 million to investigate the labor practices and eliminate the “Worst Forms of Child Labor,” the official term from the International Labor Organization, by 2005. When the July 2005 deadline arrived with the industries yet to make major changes, an extension was granted until 2008.

CANDY MADE BY CHILD SLAVES-The Daily Beast


ONE CUP ONE CHANGE ONE SIP

HOW YOU DO ANYTHING IS HOW YOU DO EVERYTHING

You may have heard that phrase, attributed to many, often said in yoga classes and  personal coaching sessions…but, there is a certain resonance to it, if you think about it.    

Once we are of an age to make mindful decisions, our choices are defined by our character.  Ponder whether you live your life in a manner in which, if it were all dissected, placed under a microscope and then broadcast to world, you would be OK with it.   You give to your favorite charities, you coach the Little League team, you let a car get in front of you during rush hour -all good.  

How about those non-public, unseen choices we make a million times a day.  Do you zone out when your friend/colleague is sharing her pain relating to her husband/son/mother/daughter,  or her own.  Are you glancing at your watch when someone is sharing their new, exciting (to them) news?  Do you allow it to register that at least 80% of the world’s population lives on less than $10.00 a day.  According to UNICEF, 22,000 children die each day due to poverty. And they “die quietly in some of the poorest villages on earth, far removed from the scrutiny and the conscience of the world. Being meek and weak in life makes these dying multitudes even more invisible in death.”  

By now, you’ve heard the term Fair Trade.  Your  fair trade certified purchases affirm that it matters to you that the people who produce the commodities you purchase, receive a fair compensation for their labor.  When they receive a fair  wage, their children can go to school and break the cycle of poverty that envelopes their community.

HOW YOU DO ANYTHING IS HOW YOU DO EVERYTHING.  

Buying fair trade coffee, chocolate and other products affirms that you are who you are claiming to be.